Tulip - Delivering the Benefits of Fat to Millions...

Tulip has a 24-year track record developing devices for the harvesting and reinjection of fat. This dedication provides the basis for why Tulip is sought after around the world by leaders in the industry for adipose-related instruments. For doctors and researchers interested in fat, Tulip proves to be a valuable partner.

Over the years, Tulip has made its mark on the world through advancing fat transfer instrumentation in unprecedented ways. As the inventor of the patented Syringe System, the patented SuperLuerLok™ hub, and the proprietary CellFriendly™ technology, Tulip was the first company to develop fat transfer technology designed to preserve cells. Tulip has been rewarded for its focus with millions of Tulip products being used by surgeons, medical practitioners, and researchers around the world – more than any other brand. Whether it’s fresh fat used for body volumizing, microfat for facial volumizing, nanofat for superficial and scar improvement or Picofat™ for regeneration, Tulip instrumentation delivers the benefits of fat to millions.

Peer-Reviewed Scientific Article

 

“Understanding Mechanical Emulsification (Nanofat) Versus Enzymatic Isolation of Tissue Stromal Vascular Fraction (tSVF) Cells from Adipose Tissue: Potential Uses in Biocellular Regenerative Medicine”

Robert W. Alexander, MD, DMD, FICS

With rapid growth of experiences and techniques in the field of Biocellular Regenerative Medicine, clinical scientists and biotechnical advancements constantly seek to understand and optimize uses of the multipotent heterogeneous cellular populations found in adipose tissue complex. The value of including the living, native bioscaffolding within the adipose tissues has likewise gained importance associated with the biologically trophic effects and cellular attachment capabilities believed to positively influence undifferentiated stromal cells in the native sites and biocellular grafts placed. These bonds are felt necessary for cellular activation, proliferation, and contributing to an auto-amplification system within the processes of homeostasis, regeneration, and repair in a “site specific” manner. Appreciation of uses of biologicals (such as platelet-rich and bone marrow concentrates) has grown, and felt to provide a trophic influence on a variety of sites and applications...

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Peer-Reviewed Scientific Article

 

“Use of the Tulip™ Microcannula Closed Syringe System
For Safe and Effective Lipoaspiration and Autologous Fat Grafting”

Robert W. Alexander, MD, DMD, FICS

For many years, cosmetic-plastic surgeons have recognized the value of low pressure lipoaspiration for successful transplantation of adipose tissue for structural augmentation. In the introductory years (1980- 1990) of liposuction techniques, autologous fat grafting (AFG) was considered unpredictable. Once bioengineers discovered the actual mechanisms by which lipoaspiration worked, the closed syringe system for gentle harvesting and transplantation was developed and patented. Early belief that effective lipoaspiration was directly related to force of vacuum was replaced by understanding, that, introduction of fluid into the fat layers permitted the adipocyte cells and stromal elements to enter into a suspension state. This suspension was then easily extracted through use of closed syringes, and provided adipose tissues with reduced cellular damage via a closed syringe system, and led to improved and more predictable grafting results...

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Peer-Reviewed Scientific Articles

 

“Nanofat Grafting: Basic Research and Clinical Applications”

Patrick Tonnard, M.D. Alexis Verpaele, M.D. Geert Peeters, M.D. Moustapha Hamdi, M.D., Ph.D. Maria Cornelissen, Ph.D. Heidi Declercq, Ph.D

The indications for fat grafting are increasing steadily. In microfat grafting, thin injection cannulas are used. The authors describe their experience of fat injection with even thinner injection needles up to 27 gauge. The fat used for this purpose is processed into “nanofat.” Clinical applications are described. Preliminary results of a study, set up to determine the cellular contents of nanofat, are presented.

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“Sharp-Needle Intradermal Fat Grafting (SNIF)”

Assaf A. Zeltzer, MD, FCCP; Patrick L. Tonnard, MD; and Alexis M. Verpaele, MD

Reversing the effects of facial aging is best accomplished with a combination of techniques. Minimizing the appearance of fine wrinkles is an essential part of treatment, which can involve resurfacing, intradermal filler injections, or a combination of the two. The quest for the ideal filler material is ongoing, but intradermal fat injections can serve as an inexpensive and safe alternative to classic intradermal fillers.

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Facial Plastic Surgery (Journal) - Feb. 2016 - Series on Facial Rejuvenation

 

“Integrating Injectable Fillers and Fat in Facial Rejuvenation”

Samuel M. Lam, MD, FACS

This article focuses on the discussion of the risks, benefits, and limitations of the three principal methods for facial volumization: fat grafting, injectable fillers, and alloplastic implants. By understanding these issues, a surgeon can better discuss what would be ideal for a particular patient. Fat grafting offers, the most cost-effective solution to a patient with sufficient volume loss. Injectable fillers provide an easy, predictable, and accurate nonsurgical alternative that is scalable in cost. Alloplastic implants are more ideally used in individuals with skeletal rather than soft-tissue deficiencies or in younger patients where the soft-tissue envelope is sufficient to mask the implant.

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“Fat Transfer Techniques: General Concepts”

Edward D. Buckingham, MD

Facial volume loss has become widely accepted as one of the contributing factors in global facial aging. Some have even suggested that bony, muscular, fatty, and dermal/ epidermal changes are more integral in the aging process than gravitational influence. Although detractors of autologous fat transfer persist, facial autologous fat transfer has become widely utilized as one option for volume restoration. Various techniques in harvesting, processing, and injecting autologous fat have been debated at length without clear guidelines emerging to maximize outcomes. This article aims to present one surgeon’s experience in successful fat grafting philosophy and technique. Areas covered will include preparation, harvesting, processing, and injection techniques. The injection techniques are organized by facial region and into the general philosophy and thinking regarding the facial region as well as the specific technique that has been utilized over 7 years and hundreds of successful procedures.

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“Illusion of Volume Loss”

Neil A. Gordon, MD; Julia Toman, MD

Facial aging can create an appearance of volume loss and responds to volume enhancement in certain clinical scenarios. Actual fat loss is an illusion created by the inter-relationship of the different tissue types. The purpose of this article is to provide the anatomical, clinical, and research evidence to differentiate the contributions to facial aging from gravity’s effects on soft tissue, fat loss, and skeletal remodeling, explaining the illusion..

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“Structural and Volumetric Changes in the Aging Face”

David J. Gerth, MD

Traditional views on facial aging and associated therapies focused on soft tissue descent and skin texture changes. Recently, revolumization for age-related lipoatrophy has become increasingly popular. Researchers are now reporting objective studies examin- ing processes of structural and volumetric changes with age in increasing frequency as well. To better understand and treat facial aging, the surgeon should review all available data. Presented here are current evidence-based studies regarding age-related changes in the facial skeleton and soft tissue envelope. By reviewing these changes by each anatomic subsite, the surgeon will be better equipped to develop an appropriate treatment plan, individualized for each patient.

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“Injectable Fillers: Review of Material and Properties”

Natalie Huang Attenello, MD; Corey S. Maas, MD, FACS

With an increasing understanding of the aging process and the rapidly growing interest in minimally invasive treatments, injectable facial fillers have changed the perspective for the treatment and rejuvenation of the aging face. Other than autologous fat and certain preformed implants, the collagen family products were the only Food and Drug Administration approved soft tissue fillers. But the overwhelming interest in soft tissue fillers had led to the increase in research and development of other products including bioengineered nonpermanent implants and permanent alloplastic implants. As multiple injectable soft tissue fillers and biostimulators are continuously becoming available, it is important to understand the biophysical properties inherent in each, as these constitute the clinical characteristics of the product. This article will review the materials and properties of the currently available soft tissue fillers: hyaluronic acid, calcium hydroxylapatite, poly-L-lactic acid, polymethylmethacrylate, and autologous fat (and aspirated tissue including stem cells).

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“Volume Rejuvenation of the Facial Upper Third”

Edward D. Buckingham, MD; Robert Glasgold, MD; Theda Kontis, MD; Stephen P. Smith, Jr., MD; Yalon Dolev, MDCM, FRCS(c); Rebecca Fitzgerald, MD; Samuel M. Lam, MD, FACS; Edwin F. Williams, MD; Taylor R. Pollei, MD

The next three articles in this issue take a unique approach to discussing volumetric restoration. Robert Glasgold has provided an assessment for each facial region and five different renowned authors (TK, SPS, RF, SML, and EFW) have been asked to speak on a particular volumetric product, of which they are considered an expert, as it applies to the different regions of the face. The articles are broken into the following: (1) upper third which corresponds to the upper eyelid, brow, temple, and forehead; (2) middle third which will cover lower eyelid, cheek, and perioral area; and (3) lower third which discusses the marionette, prejowl, and jawline. Our hope is that by placing differing opinions of experienced authors, organized by facial region together, the reader will have the opportunity to more readily compare the options. The contributing authors and their product area are as follows: Theda Kontis, MD—hyaluronic acid; Steve Smith, MD—calcium hydroxyl appetite; Rebecca Fitzgerald, MD—poly-L lactic acid; Sam Lam, MD—polymethyl methacrylate; and Edwin Williams, MD—Autologous Fat Transfer. If the author included general comments on the product, they are included in the article on the upper face only and are not repeated. Please note that other individuals may also have significantly assisted in the production of these articles, but those listed above are the senior authors.

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“Volume Management of the Middle Third-Lower Orbit/Midface”

Edward D. Buckingham, MD; Robert Glasgold, MD; Theda Kontis, MD; Stephen P. Smith Jr., MD; Yalon Dolev, MDCM, FRCS(c); Rebecca Fitzgerald, MD; Samuel M. Lam, MD, FACS; Edwin F. Williams, MD; Taylor R. Pollei, MD

This is the second of the three articles discussing volumetric rejuvenation of the face. The previous article, Volume Rejuvenation of the Facial Upper Third, focused on the upper one-third of the face while this article focuses on the middle one-third, primarily the lower eyelid, cheek, and perioral area. Again, the authors (RG, TK, SPS, RF, SL, and EFW) from the upper face article have provided a summary of rejuvenation utilizing a product of which they are considered an expert. Robert Glasgold has provided volumetric analysis of the region as an introduction.

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“Volume Rejuvenation of the Lower Third, Perioral, and Jawline”

Edward D. Buckingham, MD; Robert Glasgold, MD; Theda Kontis, MD; Stephen P. Smith, Jr., MD; Yalon Dolev, MDCM, FRCS(c); Rebecca Fitzgerald, MD; Samuel M. Lam, MD, FACS; Edwin F. Williams, MD; Taylor R. Pollei, MD

This is the second of the three articles discussing volumetric rejuvenation of the face. The previous article, Volume Rejuvenation of the Facial Upper Third, focused on the upper one-third of the face while this article focuses on the middle one-third, primarily the lower eyelid, cheek, and perioral area. Again, the authors (RG, TK, SPS, RF, SL, and EFW) from the upper face article have provided a summary of rejuvenation utilizing a product of which they are considered an expert. Robert Glasgold has provided volumetric analysis of the region as an introduction.

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Do you have an idea for an article? Give us a call or send us an email we would be interested in your suggestions.

Makeovers With Plastic Surgery to Look Like a Celebrity

See Tulip Instruments in action in this ABC Nghitline Video News Article about patients undergoing fat grafting procedures.
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Tulip is the #1 Fat Transfer Instrument of Choice

As early as 1996 Tulip was pioneering the potential of properly harvested fat cells. Through ground-breaking research we funded at the University of Pittsburgh, we proved that adipose tissue indeed contains undifferentiated cells that can be differentiated into cartilage, bone and connective tissue. How the list of potentialities from ADSC has grown since those early years!

Our commitment to fat as a viable resource for regenerative therapy led to the development of our CellFriendly technology. The Tulip Cell Friendly instrumentation is truly Fat-Friendly. It is designed to harvest and reimplant adipose cells in a more friendly manner than traditional stainless steel. Cell Friendly not only makes for a more viable harvest and predictable implant, it is also more friendly to the patient. Some Tulip users report seeing up to 60% less tissue trauma in their patients compared to the trauma caused by stainless steel fat transfer instruments.

Tulip Fat Harvesting and Injection Instrument Set